Petabridge does .NET open source software. One of the great things that’s happening in .NET-land right now is that scores of developers from traditionally more conservative, pure Microsoft stack companies are starting to become not just users of open source software, but also contributors!

Since lots of .NET developers are new to Github, having been previously raised on a steady diet of Perforce and Team Foundation Server, I put this video together illustrating how to do all of the Github workflows used by most major .NET OSS projects.

2016 is going to be a big year for Akka.NET, and we’re starting things off right by hosting our second Akka.NET Virtual Meetup on Tuesday, January 26th @ 18:00UTC. RSVP Here.

Update: thanks to everyone who attended! You can view the meetup below!

Creating Persistent Actors in Akka.NET with Akka.Persistence

How to Create Akka.NET Actors with Durable State

One of the most frequently asked questions I get is about how to create stateful actors that are also durable by default, meaning that the actor can recover its state from some sort of storage engine in the event that the entire Akka.NET process needs to be restarted.

Enter Akka.Persistence - an entire framework built into Akka.NET that’s designed to allow you to create actors with durable state that can be persisted on any database or storage system you want.

In this post we’re going to explore the concepts behind Akka.Persistence, how it works, and what some of the available storage options are.