Akka.NET - a C# port of Typesafe's Akka project

Today the Akka.NET project hit a massive milestone and became code complete for version 1.0.

This puts us on track to hit the v1.0 public release within the timeframe that we (the core Akka.NET contributors) committed to back in February.

“Code Complete?”

This means that every major feature and every public API has been completed and finalized in preparation for release.

1.0 is the release in which we’re going to shed Akka.NET’s -beta tag and commit to preserving these APIs long-term, so this is a major deal. More than a year’s worth of production usage, discussion, and designs have gone into these APIs.

A lot of carefully considered choices and designs go into each Akka.NET release, but this is the most important one we’ve ever done.

Here’s what will be included in the stable release of Akka.NET v1.0, for both Mono and Windows:

  • Akka.NET Core
  • Akka.FSharp
  • Akka.Remote
  • Akka.TestKit
  • Akka.DI (dependency injection)
  • Akka.Loggers (logging)

We will be committing to the v1.0 APIs for long-term, production use.

Can I Still Contribute to 1.0?

Yes! You can! We’re no longer accepting public API modifications or additions, but here are some areas where we’re still actively accepting and encouraging contributions:

  1. Bug fixes;
  2. Spec verification;
  3. Enhancements (don’t affect the public API);
  4. Documentation;
  5. And work on modules that aren’t shipping as part of V1.0, such as Akka.Cluster and Akka.Persistence.

If you want to start contributing to Akka.NET, join us in the Akka.NET Gitter chat. We’re a friendly bunch!

Timeline For V1.0 Release

We still have some work we do before we release the v1.0 bits - mostly documentation (oh...

Today we’re going to learn about one of the really cool things actors can do: change their behavior at run-time!

This capability allows you to do all sorts of cool stuff, like build Finite State Machines (FSM) or change how your actors handle messages based on other messages they’ve received.

Today, we’re going to cover how to make a basic FSM using switchable behavior. We’ll go over advanced FSM approaches in a future post.

Let’s start with a real-world scenario in which you’d want the ability to change an actor’s behavior.

Real-world Scenario: Authentication

Imagine you’re building a simple chat system using Akka.NET actors, and here’s what your UserActor looks like - this is the actor that is responsible for all communication to and from a specific human user.

public class UserActor : ReceiveActor { private readonly string _userId; private readonly string _chatRoomId; public UserActor(string userId, string chatRoomId) { _userId = userId; _chatRoomId = chatRoomId; Receive<IncomingMessage>(inc => inc.ChatRoomId == _chatRoomId, inc => { // print message for user  }); Receive<OutgoingMessage>(inc => inc.ChatRoomId == _chatRoomId, inc => { // send message to chatroom  }); } } 

So we have basic chat working - yay! But… right now there’s nothing to guarantee that this user is who they say they are. This system needs some authentication.

...

Now that Akka.NET is leaving beta and hitting the 1.0 milestone, we’ve seen interest and production usage ramp up quickly.

The Last Few Months

Over the last two months, we’ve been working with several cutting-edge teams to help them rearchitect and build out new systems for use cases as diverse as citywide Internet of Things (IoT) monitoring, rearchitecting to microservices, and converting their ETL pipelines from batch to realtime.

Oh, and we’ve been teaching a lot of people the actor model and how to use Akka.NET through our Akka.NET Bootcamp and on-site training.

During that time, we got a little busy and forgot to announce this, so let’s fix that: Petabridge is now officially available for consulting, training, and support!

How We Can Help You

Consulting

Get your Akka.NET projects out the door faster by getting some help from the people who work on it.

Whether you’re looking to rearchitect your system to use microservices, migrate from hacky batch processing to responsive + streaming ETL, or you want to build out scalable new capabilities from scratch, we can help you get there faster. We also have a special offering for combining Akka.NET with Cassandra.

In-person Training

Want to learn how Akka.Cluster and Akka.Persistence can help you build high availability systems easily? And how to integrate them with other technologies your company currently uses like ASP.NET, SignalR, NServiceBus, or Windows Azure?

Well, we do that!

Support

Get fast resolutions to your issues with Akka.NET applications from members of the core engineering team.

In short, we can help you create the new system you’ve envisioned, train your team, and/or help you through whatever bugs come up in your system, saving you tens of thousands of dollars and hundreds of hours of aggravation.

Let’s...